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Archive for April, 2005

More anti-teaching

When he was young the great Zen Master Ma-tzu was known for his hard
practicing. One day the Seventh Patriarch, Huai-jang, came upon Ma-tzu
meditating in his hut. Having heard of his reputation, Huai-jang
decided to test him. He entered the hut and questioned Ma-tzu as to the
purpose of meditation practice. Ma-tzu replied that he was practicing
to become an enlightened being, a Buddha.

Saying nothing, Huai-jang picked up a discarded brick and
started rubbing it with a rock. After a while, Ma-tzu’s curiosity got
the best of him. "Why are you grinding on that brick?" he asked.

Huai-jang replied, "I’m polishing it into a mirror."

Somewhat perturbed, Ma-tzu blurted: "How can you possibly make a mirror by polishing a brick?"

Huai-jang’s reply was immediate: "How can you become a Buddha by
practicing meditation?" Hearing these words, Ma-tzu had an opening.

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U G & G I

There is something quite similar about these characters. Their radicalism, their originality, the two letters before their names.

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U G & G I

There is something quite similar about these characters. Their radicalism, their originality, the two letters before their names.

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U G

Cover1994All insights, however extraordinary they may be, are worthless, because it is thought that has created what we call insight, and through that it is maintaining its continuity and status quo.
_______

The certainty that I have that there is no mind is something which cannot be transmitted to anybody, however hard I may try. You are not ready to accept this statement because the very thing which we are using to communicate is in jeopardy.
_______

Thought is something dead and can never touch anything living. It cannot capture life, contain it, and give expression to it. The moment it tries to touch life, it is destroyed by the living quality of life.

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G I

Gurdjieff"The learned beings collected in this way there in the city of Babylon from almost the whole planet used often to meet together and of course to discuss among themselves, as is proper to the learned beings of the planet Earth, questions which were either immeasurably beyond their comprehension, or about which they could never elucidate anything useful whatsoever, either for themselves or for ordinary beings there." Beelzebub’s tales to his grandson page 329.

Sound familiar?

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Wrote a book on vagrancy apparantly. 

I like this bit…

"Vagrants are often tolerated as scavengers, and in
certain East Asian countries they are ascribed semireligious qualities,
revered, but also feared, for their spiritual powers. Vagrants are
basically a product of unemployment and their numbers swell during
depressions."

See C. J. Ribton-Turner, The History of Vagrants and Vagrancy (1887, repr. 1972).

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Jean-Michel Terdjman on UG

Liberation is what the ego wants.  But U.G. cannot give it to
us because we are already liberated.  That is, we are already in our
natural state, existing as events in nature (where else or how else
could we exist?). The problem is, we are already liberated, but we want
to know it. We want to experience liberation. Unfortunately, the natural
state in which we are cannot experience itself, or know itself. Only the
sense of the I — the absolute illusion of the ego — can know itself or
think itself. The ego is a byproduct of mental activity, of thought, of
the act of knowing, and it wants to know itself beyond knowledge. This
is like the reflection in a mirror trying to be a concrete material
object in three dimensions. The quest for liberation, the desire to know
liberation is, of course, doomed and self-contradictory, yet, at the same
time, very pleasurable, because by so doing the ego experiences itself,
thus increasing and reinforcing itself. As Spinoza says, everything in
nature wants to persevere in its own being, and to reinforce it.
 

Is U.G. "free"? No more than you and I. His conditioning is as
thorough as anybody’s — all events in nature exist in the chain of
causes. But there is nobody there to experience either the desire for
liberation, or the imagined freedom that is supposed to come after the
cessation of desire. U.G. is neither free nor in bondage, because he is
not. How about us? Our objective existence is no different from his. Our
subjective sense of the self creates the concepts of freedom and
bondage. We may think equally that we are free or in bondage. Like U.G.,
we are neither. Just events in nature.

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